Growth

} Growth refers to an increase in some quantity over time. The quantity can be:

  • Physical (e.g., growth in height, growth in an amount of money)
  • Abstract (e.g., a system becoming more complex, an organism becoming more mature).

It can also refer to the mode of growth, i.e. numeric models for describing how much a particular quantity grows over time.

Biology
  • Cell growth
  • A tumor is sometimes referred to as a "growth"
  • Bacterial growth
  • Human development (biology)
    • Auxology, the study of all aspects of human physical growth
  • Growth hormone
Social science
  • Human development (humanity)
  • Developmental psychology
  • Personal development ("Personal growth")
  • Erikson's stages of psychosocial development, stages of individual growth
  • Population growth
Economy
  • Economic growth
  • For financial growth due to simple interest or compound interest see Interest
  • Growth investing
Mathematical models
  • Linear growth
  • Logistic growth, characterized as an S curve
  • Exponential growth, also called geometric growth
  • Hyperbolic growth
Films
  • Growth (film), a 2010 American horror film

Famous quotes containing the word growth:

    Here commences what was called, twenty years ago, the best timber land in the State. This very spot was described as “covered with the greatest abundance of pine,” but now this appeared to me, comparatively, an uncommon tree there,—and yet you did not see where any more could have stood, amid the dense growth of cedar, fir, etc.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Next to the right of liberty, the right of property is the most important individual right guaranteed by the Constitution and the one which, united with that of personal liberty, has contributed more to the growth of civilization than any other institution established by the human race.
    William Howard Taft (1857–1930)

    Those who have been immersed in the tragedy of massive death during wartime, and who have faced it squarely, never allowing their senses and feelings to become numbed and indifferent, have emerged from their experiences with growth and humanness greater than that achieved through almost any other means.
    Elisabeth Kübler-Ross (b. 1926)