Who is letty cottin pogrebin?

Letty Cottin Pogrebin

Letty Cottin Pogrebin (born June 9, 1939) is an American author, journalist, nationally-known lecturer, and social justice activist. Her tenth book, How to Be A Friend to A Friend Who’s Sick, will be published in April, 2013.

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    America is a nation fundamentally ambivalent about its children, often afraid of its children, and frequently punitive toward its children.
    Letty Cottin Pogrebin (20th century)

    The risk for a woman who considers her helpless children her “job” is that the children’s growth toward self-sufficiency may be experienced as a refutation of the mother’s indispensability, and she may unconsciously sabotage their growth as a result.
    —Letty Cottin Pogrebin (20th century)

    There are two kinds of fathers in traditional households: the fathers of sons and the fathers of daughters. These two kinds of fathers sometimes co-exist in one and the same man. For instance, Daughter’s Father kisses his little girl goodnight, strokes her hair, hugs her warmly, then goes into the next room where he becomes Son’s Father, who says in a hearty voice, perhaps with a light punch on the boy’s shoulder: “Goodnight, Son, see ya in the morning.”
    Letty Cottin Pogrebin (20th century)

    If family violence teaches children that might makes right at home, how will we hope to cure the futile impulse to solve worldly conflicts with force?
    —Letty Cottin Pogrebin (20th century)

    I find it profoundly symbolic that I am appearing before a committee of fifteen men who will report to a legislative body of one hundred men because of a decision handed down by a court comprised of nine men—on an issue that affects millions of women.... I have the feeling that if men could get pregnant, we wouldn’t be struggling for this legislation. If men could get pregnant, maternity benefits would be as sacrosanct as the G.I. Bill.
    —Letty Cottin Pogrebin (20th century)