General Election

In a parliamentary system, a general election is an election in which all or most members of a given political body are chosen. The term is usually used to refer to elections held for a nation's primary legislative body, as distinguished from by-elections and local elections.

In presidential systems, the term refers to a regularly-scheduled election where both the president, and either "a class" of or all members of the national legislature are elected at the same time. A general election day may also include elections for local officials.

The term originates in the United Kingdom general elections for the House of Commons.

Read more about General Election:  In The United Kingdom, In Hong Kong, In India, Japan, American Usage

Famous quotes containing the words general and/or election:

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