Fly

Fly

Nematocera (includes Eudiptera)
Brachycera

True flies are insects of the order Diptera (from the Greek di = two, and ptera = wings). Their most obvious distinction from other orders of insects is that a typical fly possesses a pair of flight wings on the mesothorax and a pair of halteres, derived from the hind wings, on the metathorax. (Some species of flies are exceptional in that they are secondarily flightless). The only other order of insects bearing two true, functional wings plus any form of halteres are the Strepsiptera, and in contrast to the flies, the Strepsiptera bear their halteres on the mesothorax and their flight wings on the metathorax.

Read more about Fly:  Order Diptera, Anatomy and Biology, Classification, Evolution, Maggots, Flies in Culture

Famous quotes containing the word fly:

    All places were now become irksome to her. She found it impossible to fly from infamy, unless she could at the same time fly from herself.
    Sarah Fielding (1710–1768)

    After us they’ll fly in hot air balloons, coat styles will change, perhaps they’ll discover a sixth sense and cultivate it, but life will remain the same, a hard life full of secrets, but happy. And a thousand years from now man will still be sighing, “Oh! Life is so hard!” and will still, like now, be afraid of death and not want to die.
    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860–1904)

    Now listen, buddy, there are a few corny ideas you got to get out of your head if you’re going to fly an airplane. Most things are just the reverse from what people think. The higher you are the safer you are. The Earth down there, that, that’s your enemy because once you hit that, boy, you splatter.
    Dalton Trumbo (1905–1976)