Fellow

A fellow in the broadest sense is someone who is an equal or a comrade. The term fellow is also used to describe a person, particularly by those in the upper social classes. It is most often used in an academic context: a fellow is often part of an elite group of learned people who are awarded fellowship to work together as peers in the pursuit of knowledge or practice. The fellows may include visiting professors, postdoctoral researchers and doctoral researchers.

Read more about Fellow:  Learned or Professional Societies, Industry / Corporate, Nonprofit / Government

Famous quotes containing the word fellow:

    Well, well, perhaps I am a bit of a talker. A popular fellow such as I am—my friends get round me—we chaff, we sparkle, we tell witty stories—and somehow my tongue gets wagging. I have the gift of conversation. I’ve been told I ought to have a salon, whatever that may be.
    Kenneth Grahame (1859–1932)

    I had a chair at every hearth,
    When no one turned to see,
    With ‘Look at that old fellow there,
    ‘And who may he be?
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

    As for your high towers and monuments, there was a crazy fellow once in this town who undertook to dig through to China, and he got so far that, as he said, he heard the Chinese pots and kettles rattle; but I think that I shall not go out of my way to admire the hole which he made.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)