Fellow

Fellow

A fellow in the broadest sense is someone who is an equal or a comrade. The term fellow is also used to describe a person, particularly by those in the upper social classes. It is most often used in an academic context: a fellow is often part of an elite group of learned people who are awarded fellowship to work together as peers in the pursuit of knowledge or practice. The fellows may include visiting professors, postdoctoral researchers and doctoral researchers.

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Famous quotes containing the word fellow:

    The knave of a thousand years ago seems a fine old fellow full of spirit and fun, little malice in his soul; whereas, the knave of to-day seems a sour-visaged wight, with nothing to redeem him.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)

    “When was I ever anything but kind to him?
    But I’ll not have the fellow back,” he said.
    “I told him so last haying, didn’t I?
    ‘If he left then,’ I said, ‘that ended it.’
    What good is he? Who else will harbor him
    At his age for the little he can do?
    Robert Frost (1874–1963)

    The sacred obligation to the Union soldiers must not—will not be forgotten nor neglected.... But those who fought against the Nation cannot and do not look to it for relief.... Confederate soldiers and their descendants are to share with us and our descendants the destiny of America. Whatever, therefore, we their fellow citizens can do to remove burdens from their shoulders and to brighten their lives is surely in the pathway of humanity and patriotism.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)