Fellow

A fellow in the broadest sense is someone who is an equal or a comrade. The term fellow is also used to describe a person, particularly by those in the upper social classes. It is most often used in an academic context: a fellow is often part of an elite group of learned people who are awarded fellowship to work together as peers in the pursuit of knowledge or practice. The fellows may include visiting professors, postdoctoral researchers and doctoral researchers.

Read more about Fellow:  Learned or Professional Societies, Industry / Corporate, Nonprofit / Government

Famous quotes containing the word fellow:

    Have mercy, little pillow,
    stay mute and uncaring,
    hear not one word of disaster!
    Stay close, little sour feather,
    little fellow full of salt.
    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)

    In the cold of Europe, under prudish northern fogs, except when slaughter is afoot, you only glimpse the crawling cruelty of your fellow men. But their rottenness rises to the surface as soon as they are tickled by the hideous fevers of the tropics.
    Louis-Ferdinand Céline (1894–1961)

    Have you noticed when reading War and Peace the difficulties Tolstoy experienced in forcing morally wounded Bolkonsky to come into geographical and chronological contact with Natasha? It is very painful to watch the way the poor fellow is dragged and pushed and shoved in order to achieve this happy reunion.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899–1977)