Evening

Evening in its primary meaning is the period of the day between afternoon and night. Though the term is subjective, evening is typically understood to begin just before dusk, when temperatures begin to fall, and last until just after nightfall, when complete darkness has been reached.

Companies often use the time of 5:00 pm to mark the beginning of the evening, for example with evening telephone call rates.

Informally, the term "evening" is used in place of "night", especially in the context of an event which takes place over the course of said "evening".

In the vernacular of at least parts of the rural American South (notably Appalachia) and in some British dialects, "evening" ( /ˈiːvnɪn/) is used to mean "afternoon", as the main meal of the day, dinner, traditionally has occurred at midday. While the exact meaning of the word in this sense is subject to interpretation, "evening" in the rural American South usually has been thought of as beginning at about noon and extending roughly until sunset or suppertime.

Famous quotes containing the word evening:

    Much we buy each market day,
    More still obtain:
    All, all is carried home
    By slow evening train.
    Philip Larkin (1922–1986)

    Television ... helps blur the distinction between framed and unframed reality. Whereas going to the movies necessarily entails leaving one’s ordinary surroundings, soap operas are in fact spatially inseparable from the rest of one’s life. In homes where television is on most of the time, they are also temporally integrated into one’s “real” life and, unlike the experience of going out in the evening to see a show, may not even interrupt its regular flow.
    Eviatar Zerubavel, U.S. sociologist, educator. The Fine Line: Making Distinctions in Everyday Life, ch. 5, University of Chicago Press (1991)

    Another evening wasted! I begin
    Writing the envelope, and a bitter smoke
    Of self-contempt, of boredom too, ascends.
    What use is an endearment and a joke?
    Philip Larkin (1922–1986)