Essex - Places of Interest

Places of Interest

Key
Abbey/Priory/Cathedral
Accessible open space
Amusement/Theme Park
Castle
Country Park
English Heritage
Forestry Commission
Heritage railway
Historic House

Museum (free/not free)
National Trust
Theatre
Zoo
  • Abberton Reservoir
  • Ashingdon (The site of the Battle of Ashingdon in 1016), near Southend, with its isolated St Andrews Church and King George's Field
  • Audley End House and Gardens, Saffron Walden
  • Clacton-On-Sea
  • Colchester Castle
  • Chelmsford Cathedral
  • Colchester Zoo
  • Colne Valley Railway
  • Cressing Temple
  • East Anglian Railway Museum
  • Epping Forest
  • Epping Ongar Railway
  • Frinton-on-Sea
  • Great Bentley, which has the largest village green in England
  • Harlow New Town
  • Hedingham Castle, between Stansted and Colchester, to the north of Braintree
  • Ingatestone Hall, Ingatestone, between Brentwood and Chelmsford
  • Kelvedon Hatch (Secret Nuclear Bunker)
  • Loughton, by Epping Forest and having a London Underground Central Line tube station
  • Maldon historic market town, close to Chelmsford and the North Sea, and site of the Battle of Maldon
  • Mangapps Railway Museum (Burnham-on-Crouch)
  • Marsh Farm Country Park (South Woodham Ferrers)
  • Mersea Island, birdwatching and rambling resort with one settlement, West Mersea
  • Mistley Towers, Manningtree, between Colchester and Ipswich, near Alton Water.
  • Mountfitchet Castle, Stansted
  • North Weald Airfield
  • Orsett Hall Hotel, Prince Charles Avenue, Orsett near Chadwell St Mary
  • St Peter-on-the-Wall
  • Saffron Walden
  • Southend Pier
  • Thames Estuary
  • Thaxted, south of Saffron Walden
  • University of Essex (Wivenhoe Park, Colchester)
  • Waltham Abbey

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