Who is frances wright?

Frances Wright

Frances Wright (September 6, 1795 – December 13, 1852) also widely known as Fanny Wright, was a Scottish-born lecturer, writer, freethinker, feminist, abolitionist, and social reformer, who became a U. S. citizen in 1825. That year she founded the Nashoba Commune in Tennessee as a utopian community to prepare slaves for emancipation, intending to create an egalitarian place, but it lasted only three years. Her Views of Society and Manners in America (1821) brought her the most attention as a critique of the new nation.

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Famous quotes containing the words frances wright, frances and/or wright:

    To give liberty to a slave before he understands its value is, perhaps, rather to impose a penalty than to bestow a blessing ...
    Frances Wright (1795–1852)

    The kiss of the sun for pardon,
    The song of the birds for mirth,
    One is nearer God’s Heart in a garden
    Than anywhere else on earth.
    —Dorothy Frances Gurney (1858–1932)

    ... the yearly expenses of the existing religious system ... exceed in these United States twenty millions of dollars. Twenty millions! For teaching what? Things unseen and causes unknown!... Twenty millions would more than suffice to make us wise; and alas! do they not more than suffice to make us foolish?
    —Frances Wright (1795–1852)