Who is frances wright?

Frances Wright

Frances Wright (September 6, 1795 – December 13, 1852) also widely known as Fanny Wright, was a Scottish-born lecturer, writer, freethinker, feminist, abolitionist, and social reformer, who became a U. S. citizen in 1825. That year she founded the Nashoba Commune in Tennessee as a utopian community to prepare slaves for emancipation, intending to create an egalitarian place, but it lasted only three years. Her Views of Society and Manners in America (1821) brought her the most attention as a critique of the new nation.

Read more about Frances Wright.

Famous quotes containing the words frances wright and/or wright:

    The sciences have ever been the surest guides to virtue.
    Frances Wright (1795–1852)

    Panting, begging I clutched childlike, clutched to the hot sides of
    death.
    Now I am dry bones and my face a stony skull staring in yellow
    surprise at the sun. . . .
    —Richard Wright (1808–1860)