Disorder

Disorder may refer to :

  • Randomness, non-order or no intelligible pattern
  • Civil disorder, one or more forms of disturbance caused by a group of people
  • Disease, an abnormal condition affecting the body of an organism

Psychological disorders:

  • Anxiety disorder, different forms of abnormal and pathological fear and anxiety
  • Conversion disorder, neurological symptoms such as numbness, blindness, paralysis, or fits, where no neurological explanation is possible
  • Mental disorder, a psychological or behavioral pattern associated with distress or disability that occurs in an individual and is not a part of normal development or culture
  • Obsessive–compulsive disorder, an anxiety disorder characterized by repetitive behaviors aimed at reducing anxiety
  • Obsessive–compulsive personality disorder, obsession with perfection, rules, and organization
  • Personality disorder, an enduring pattern of inner experience and behavior that deviates markedly from the expectations of the culture of the individual who exhibits it
  • Order and disorder (physics).
  • Lawlessness, a lack of laws or law enforcement
  • Randomness, a lack of intelligible pattern or combination in information theory, mathematics, and computer programming
  • Disorder (band), Bristol based hardcore punk band
  • Disorder (film), a Chinese documentary
  • Disorder (album), by The Gazette
  • "Disorder", a song by Joy Division, from their album Unknown Pleasures
  • Dis-order is the CD/DVD/Merchandise mailorder of Displeased Records



Famous quotes containing the word disorder:

    Both of us felt more anxiety about the South—about the colored people especially—than about anything else sinister in the result. My hope of a sound currency will somehow be realized; civil service reform will be delayed; but the great injury is in the South. There the Amendments will be nullified, disorder will continue, prosperity to both whites and colored people will be pushed off for years.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)

    Without metaphor the handling of general concepts such as culture and civilization becomes impossible, and that of disease and disorder is the obvious one for the case in point. Is not crisis itself a concept we owe to Hippocrates? In the social and cultural domain no metaphor is more apt than the pathological one.
    Johan Huizinga (1872–1945)

    The doctor found, when she was dead,
    Her last disorder mortal.
    Oliver Goldsmith (1728–1774)