Dawn

Dawn (from an Old English verb dagian "to become day") is the time that marks the beginning of the twilight before sunrise. It is recognized by the presence of weak sunlight, while the sun itself is still below the horizon. Dawn should not be confused with sunrise, which is the moment when the leading edge of the sun itself appears above the horizon.

The duration of the twilight period between dawn and sunrise varies greatly depending on the observer's latitude, from a few minutes in equatorial regions to many hours in polar regions.


Read more about Dawn:  Technical Definitions, Causes and Effects, Mythology and Religion, Literature

Famous quotes containing the word dawn:

    Beloved, may your sleep be sound
    That have found it where you fed.
    What were all the world’s alarms
    To mighty Paris when he found
    Sleep upon a golden bed
    That first dawn in Helen’s arms?
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

    And you shall wake, from country sleep, this dawn and each first dawn,
    Your faith as deathless as the outcry of the ruled sun.
    Dylan Thomas (1914–1953)

    We are independent of the change we detect. The longer the lever, the less perceptible its motion. It is the slowest pulsation which is the most vital. The hero then will know how to wait, as well as to make haste. All good abides with him who waiteth wisely; we shall sooner overtake the dawn by remaining here than by hurrying over the hills of the west.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)