Dawn

Dawn (from an Old English verb dagian "to become day") is the time that marks the beginning of the twilight before sunrise. It is recognized by the presence of weak sunlight, while the sun itself is still below the horizon. Dawn should not be confused with sunrise, which is the moment when the leading edge of the sun itself appears above the horizon.

The duration of the twilight period between dawn and sunrise varies greatly depending on the observer's latitude, from a few minutes in equatorial regions to many hours in polar regions.


Read more about Dawn:  Technical Definitions, Causes and Effects, Mythology and Religion, Literature

Famous quotes containing the word dawn:

    How does Nature deify us with a few and cheap elements! Give me health and a day, and I will make the pomp of emperors ridiculous. The dawn is my Assyria; the sun-set and moon-rise my Paphos, and unimaginable realms of faerie; broad noon shall be my England of the senses and the understanding; the night shall be my Germany of mystic philosophy and dreams.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    We are independent of the change we detect. The longer the lever, the less perceptible its motion. It is the slowest pulsation which is the most vital. The hero then will know how to wait, as well as to make haste. All good abides with him who waiteth wisely; we shall sooner overtake the dawn by remaining here than by hurrying over the hills of the west.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    A barnacle goose
    Far up in the stretches of night; night splits and the dawn breaks loose;
    I, through the terrible novelty of light, stalk on, stalk on;
    Those great sea-horses bare their teeth and laugh at the dawn.
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)