Daughter

A daughter is a female offspring; a girl, woman, or female animal in relation to her parents. Daughterhood is the state of being a daughter. The masculine counterpart is a son. Analogously the name is used in several areas to show relations between groups or elements.

In patriarchal societies, daughters often have different or lesser familial rights than sons. A family may prefer to have sons rather than daughters, with the daughters subjected to female infanticide. In some societies it is the custom for a daughter to be 'sold' to her husband, who must pay a bride price. The reverse of this custom, where the parents pay the husband a sum of money to compensate for the financial burden of the woman, is found in societies where women do not labour outside the home, and is referred to as dowry.

In the United States, the birth rate is 105 sons to 100 daughters which has been the natural birth rate since the 18th century. About 80 percent of prospective adoptive parents from the US will choose a girl over a boy.

Read more about Daughter:  In The Bible

Famous quotes containing the word daughter:

    To a maiden true he’ll give his hand,
    Hey lillie, ho lillie lallie,
    To the king’s daughter o’ fair England,
    To a prize that was won by a slain brother’s brand,
    I’ the brave nights so early.
    Unknown. Earl Brand (l. 67–71)

    For every nineteenth-century middle-class family that protected its wife and child within the family circle, there was an Irish or a German girl scrubbing floors in that home, a Welsh boy mining coal to keep the home-baked goodies warm, a black girl doing the family laundry, a black mother and child picking cotton to be made into clothes for the family, and a Jewish or an Italian daughter in a sweatshop making “ladies” dresses or artificial flowers for the family to purchase.
    Stephanie Coontz (20th century)

    I may neither choose who I would, nor refuse who I dislike; so is the will of a living daughter curbed by the will of a dead father.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)