Dance - Dance Studies and Techniques

Dance Studies and Techniques

See also: Dance theory, Choreography, and Dance moves

In the early 1920s, dance studies (dance practice, critical theory, Musical analysis and history) began to be considered as an academic discipline. Today these studies are an integral part of many universities' arts and humanities programs. By the late 20th century the recognition of practical knowledge as equal to academic knowledge led to the emergence of practice research and practice as research. A large range of dance courses are available including:

  • Professional practice: performance and technical skills
  • Practice research: choreography and performance
  • Ethnochoreology, encompassing the dance-related aspects of: anthropology, cultural studies, gender studies, area studies, postcolonial theory, ethnography, etc.
  • Dance therapy, or dance-movement therapy
  • Dance and technology: new media and performance technologies
  • Laban Movement Analysis and somatic studies

Academic degrees are available from BA (Hons) to PhD and other postdoctoral fellowships, with some dance scholars taking up their studies as mature students after a professional dance career.

Read more about this topic:  Dance

Famous quotes containing the words dance, studies and/or techniques:

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