Damage

Damage may refer to:

Read more about Damage:  General Concepts

Other articles related to "damage":

National Museum Of Australia - Architecture - Hail Storm Damage
... on the afternoon of 29 December 2006 and caused roof damage to the administration section of the Museum ... The damage exposed power cables and left two centimetres of water on the floor ... The damage was expected to cost at least A$500,000 to repair ...
Watts Towers - After Rodia - Damage
... The structures suffered minor damage in the Northridge earthquake in 1994, after which they were repaired and reopened in 2001 ... There is also damage from random acts of vandalism ...
Damage - Entertainment - Music
... Damage (band), a New York hardcore band, active 1983–1988 Damage (British band), a British R B boy band "Damage" (The Cooper Temple Clause song ...
Frontal Lobe - Damage
... discuss in a review of many studies how damage to the frontal lobe can occur in an assortment of ways and result in many different consequences ... (TIAs) and/or strokes are common causes of frontal lobe damage in older adults (ages 65 and older) ... Common effects of damage to the frontal lobe are varied ...
Volunteer State Community College - April 7, 2006 Tornado
... The Hal Reed Ramer Administration Building received major damage, including damage to the office of the President ... Noble Caudill Hall suffered perhaps the worst damage, as much of the second floor on the south side of the building collapsed, and a large section of roofing above WVCP radio and the ... In all, eleven classrooms had to be relocated due to damage and 72 faculty and staff offices were moved ...

Famous quotes containing the word damage:

    A cure by regression is homeopathic, like healing the damage done by ministers and ignorance with stupidity and Jesuits.
    Franz Grillparzer (1791–1872)

    I came to explore the wreck.
    The words are purposes.
    The words are maps.
    I came to see the damage that was done
    and the treasures that prevail.
    Adrienne Rich (b. 1929)

    Instead of asking—”How much damage will the work in question bring about?” why not ask—”How much good? How much joy?”
    Henry Miller (1891–1980)