Count

Count (male) or Countess (female) is a title in European countries for a noble of varying status, but historically deemed to convey an approximate rank intermediate between the highest and lowest titles of nobility. The word count came into English from the French comte, itself from Latin comes—in its accusative comitem—meaning "companion", and later "companion of the emperor, delegate of the emperor". The adjective form of the word is "comital". The British and Irish equivalent is an earl (whose wife is a "countess", for lack of an English term). Alternative names for the "Count" rank in the nobility structure are used in other countries, such as Graf in Germany and Hakushaku during the Japanese Imperial era.

Read more about Count:  Definition, Comital Titles in Different European Languages, Equivalents

Famous quotes containing the word count:

    I count those feathered balls of soot
    The moor-hen guides upon the stream,
    To silence the envy in my thought;
    And turn towards my chamber, caught
    In the cold snows of a dream.
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

    It is easier to sail many thousand miles through cold and storm and cannibals, in a government ship, with five hundred men and boys to assist one, than it is to explore the private sea, the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean of one’s being alone.... It is not worth the while to go round the world to count the cats in Zanzibar.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    The opera isn’t over till the fat lady sings.
    —Anonymous.

    A modern proverb along the lines of “don’t count your chickens before they’re hatched.” This form of words has no precise origin, though both Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations (16th ed., 1992)