Armenian Apostolic Church - Armenian Religious Communities in Artsakh (Nagorno Karabakh)

Armenian Religious Communities in Artsakh (Nagorno Karabakh)

Due to the Bolshevik revolution and the subsequent annexation of Armenia by the U.S.S.R., all functioning religious institutions in Armenia and Artsakh were closed down, and their clergymen either exiled or shot. The Armenian Apostolic Church resumed its activities in 1989 and, over the next 20 years, more than 30 churches were restored or constructed. In 2009, the Artsakh government introduced a law entitled "Freedom of Conscience and Religious Organisations", article 8 of which stated that only the Armenian Apostolic Orthodox Church is allowed to preach on the territory of the Nagorno-Karabakh Republic. However, the law did make processes available for other religious institutions to get approval from the government if they wished to worship within the Republic.

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