Alisa Kleybanova - Career

Career

Kleybanova made her senior tennis début in 2003 aged fourteen, and won the first ITF tournament she entered.

To date her career-best achievements have been reaching the fourth round at two Grand Slams at Wimbledon and Australian Open as a direct entrant, two WTA Tour Tier II quarter-finals (Antwerp, 2008; Eastbourne, 2008) as a qualifier. Additionally, she has reached one Tier I third round (Miami, 2008) as a qualifier, and one Tier IV quarter-final (Fes, 2008) as a direct entrant. At other WTA Tour events, she has yet to progress beyond the second round of the main draw; but her WTA career is still young, and she has battled through qualifying to enter one Grand Slam and several further WTA main draws aside from her five notable main draw successes described above.

At the higher levels of the ITF circuit, she has reached one $100,000 quarter-final, two $75,000 quarter-finals, one $50,000 final and one $50,000 semi-final. In addition, at the lower levels, she has won seven $25,000 titles and one $10,000 title outright, and has reached two further $25,000 finals and another three $25,000 semifinals.

She has also experienced success in the juniors; she won the 2003 Wimbledon Championships girls' doubles with Sania Mirza, aged 13. Three years later, she won the same competition with fellow rising Russian star Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova. She also won the girls' doubles at the 2005 US Open with Czech Nikola Franková.

Many critics have cited that Kleybanova's style of play is the modern day version of American Lindsay Davenport.

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