Aleutian Islands - Climate

Climate

The climate of the islands is oceanic, with moderate and fairly uniform temperatures and heavy rainfall. Fogs are almost constant. Summer weather is much cooler than Southeast Alaska (around Sitka), but the winter temperature of the islands and of the Alaska Panhandle is very nearly the same. During the winter time the islands are the center for the semi-permanent low-pressure area called the Aleutian low.

The mean annual temperature for Unalaska, the most populated island of the group, is about 38°F (3°C), being about 30°F (−1°C) in January and about 52 °F (11 °C) in August. The highest and lowest temperatures recorded on the islands are 78°F (26°C) and 5°F (−15°C) respectively. The average annual rainfall is about 80 inches (2,000 mm), and Unalaska, with about 250 rainy days per year, is said to be one of the rainiest places within the United States.

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