Advantage

Advantage may refer to:

  • In military terms, advantage is the superiority in elevation which one side enjoys over the opposing element (Advantage of terrain)
  • In tennis, advantage is when one player wins a point from a deuce and needs one more point to win the game. (See Tennis terminolog)
  • Advantage (cryptography), a measure of the effectiveness of an enemy's code-breaking effort
  • A term in soccer In-field play advantage
  • A joystick produced by Asciiware for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (Super Advantage)
  • Either of two ships of the British Navy (HMS Advantage)
  • In Engineering, advantage is the ratio of output force to the input force of a mechanical, electrical, hydraulic or other physical system (Mechanical advantage)
  • A breakfast cereal.
  • The NES Advantage: an arcade modeled joystick for the Nintendo Entertainment System
  • Advantage (band), an English brass rock band (fl. 2000s)
  • Advantage (film), a 1977 Bulgarian film
  • The Advantage, an American indie rock band covering old Nintendo music (fl. 2000s)
  • The Gillig Advantage, a name given to Gillig's low-floor transit bus
  • In veterinary medicine, Advantage or Advantage Flea Killer is a brand name for imidacloprid, a flea-poison for pets
  • Advantage Rent A Car - car rental
  • Advantage Database Server, a database product from Sybase iAnywhere
  • GP Advantage, a brand of printer paper owned by Georgia-Pacific

Famous quotes containing the word advantage:

    A good man often appears gauche simply because he does not take advantage of the myriad mean little chances of making himself look stylish. Preferring truth to form, he is not constantly at work upon the fa├žade of his appearance.
    Iris Murdoch (b. 1919)

    Nothing could his enemies do but it rebounded to his infinite advantage,—that is, to the advantage of his cause.... No theatrical manager could have arranged things so wisely to give effect to his behavior and words. And who, think you, was the manager? Who placed the slave-woman and her child, whom he stooped to kiss for a symbol, between his prison and the gallows?
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Every accent, every emphasis, every modulation of voice, was so perfectly well turned and well placed, that, without being interested in the subject, one could not help being pleased with the discourse; a pleasure of much the same kind with that received from an excellent piece of music. This is an advantage itinerant preachers have over those who are stationary, as the latter can not well improve their delivery of a sermon by so many rehearsals.
    Benjamin Franklin (1706–1790)