Advantage

Advantage may refer to:

  • In military terms, advantage is the superiority in elevation which one side enjoys over the opposing element (Advantage of terrain)
  • In tennis, advantage is when one player wins a point from a deuce and needs one more point to win the game. (See Tennis terminolog)
  • Advantage (cryptography), a measure of the effectiveness of an enemy's code-breaking effort
  • A term in soccer In-field play advantage
  • A joystick produced by Asciiware for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (Super Advantage)
  • Either of two ships of the British Navy (HMS Advantage)
  • In Engineering, advantage is the ratio of output force to the input force of a mechanical, electrical, hydraulic or other physical system (Mechanical advantage)
  • A breakfast cereal.
  • The NES Advantage: an arcade modeled joystick for the Nintendo Entertainment System
  • Advantage (band), an English brass rock band (fl. 2000s)
  • Advantage (film), a 1977 Bulgarian film
  • The Advantage, an American indie rock band covering old Nintendo music (fl. 2000s)
  • The Gillig Advantage, a name given to Gillig's low-floor transit bus
  • In veterinary medicine, Advantage or Advantage Flea Killer is a brand name for imidacloprid, a flea-poison for pets
  • Advantage Rent A Car - car rental
  • Advantage Database Server, a database product from Sybase iAnywhere
  • GP Advantage, a brand of printer paper owned by Georgia-Pacific

Famous quotes containing the word advantage:

    The advantage of love at first sight is that it delays a second sight.
    Natalie Clifford Barney (1876–1972)

    The great advantage of a hotel is that it’s a refuge from home life.
    George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)

    With wonderful art he grinds into paint for his picture all his moods and experiences, so that all his forces may be brought to the encounter. Apparently writing without a particular design or responsibility, setting down his soliloquies from time to time, taking advantage of all his humors, when at length the hour comes to declare himself, he puts down in plain English, without quotation marks, what he, Thomas Carlyle, is ready to defend in the face of the world.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)