Vein

Vein

In the circulatory system, veins (from the Latin vena) are blood vessels that carry blood towards the heart. Most veins carry deoxygenated blood from the tissues back to the heart; exceptions are the pulmonary and umbilical veins, both of which carry oxygenated blood to the heart. Veins differ from arteries in structure and function; for example, arteries are more muscular than veins, veins are often closer to the skin and contain valves to help keep blood flowing toward the heart, while arteries carry blood away from the heart.

Read more about Vein:  Anatomy, Function, Classification

Other articles related to "vein, veins":

Colon (anatomy) - Anatomy
... drainage usually mirrors colonic arterial supply, with the inferior mesenteric vein draining into the splenic vein, and the superior mesenteric vein joining the splenic vein to form the hepatic portal ...
Vein - Clinical Significance - Venous Diseases - Thrombophlebitis
... Thrombophlebitis is an inflammatory condition of the veins related to blood clots. ...
Suprascapular Vein
... The suprascapular vein is a vein running above the scapula ... It empties into the external jugular vein ...
Brodie–Trendelenburg Percussion Test
... test to determine valvular incompetence in superficial veins ... A finger is placed over the lower (distal) part of the vein being examined ... The upper (proximal) part of the vein is then tapped (percussed) ...
Cobalt Silver Rush - Rush
... On his second day he found a vein, and staked it with another prospector, Alex Longwell ... Immediately thereafter he found a second vein, staking it for himself, while Longwell went off to stake another of his own ... year another $2,000,000 worth of ore was shipped, but the obvious surface veins were mined out ...

Famous quotes containing the word vein:

    As polishing expresses the vein in marble, and grain in wood, so music brings out what of heroic lurks anywhere. The hero is the sole patron of music.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    No man is quite sane; each has a vein of folly in his composition, a slight determination of blood to the head, to make sure of holding him hard to some one point which nature has taken to heart.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)