University of Copenhagen Institute For Mathematical Sciences

University Of Copenhagen Institute For Mathematical Sciences

The Department of Mathematical Sciences (Danish: Institut for Matematiske Fag ved Københavns Universitet) is an institute under the Faculty of Science at the University of Copenhagen.

The department is located in the E building of the Hans Christian Ørsted Institute, on Universitetsparken 5 in Copenhagen, Denmark.

From the founding of the University of Copenhagen in 1479, mathematics had been part of the Faculty of Philosophy. In 1850 it was moved to the new faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences. The Institute for Mathematical Sciences was first created in 1934 next to the Niels Bohr Institute building, when Carlsberg Foundation donated money for a building in celebration of the 450th anniversary of the University of Copenhagen in 1929. In 1963 the institute moved to its current location.

Read more about University Of Copenhagen Institute For Mathematical SciencesMathematical Research

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University Of Copenhagen Institute For Mathematical Sciences - Mathematical Research
... of mathematics are being covered by the fields of interest of different researchers at the institute ...

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