Building

In architecture, construction, engineering, real estate development and technology the word building may refer to one of the following:

  1. Any human-made structure used or intended for supporting or sheltering any use or continuous occupancy, or
  2. An act of construction (i. e. the activity of building, see also builder)

In this article, the first usage is generally intended unless otherwise specified.

Buildings come in a wide amount of shapes and functions, and have been adapted throughout history for a wide number of factors, from building materials available, to weather conditions, to land prices, ground conditions, specific uses and aesthetic reasons.

Buildings serve several needs of society – primarily as shelter from weather and as general living space, to provide privacy, to store belongings and to comfortably live and work. A building as a shelter represents a physical division of the human habitat (a place of comfort and safety) and the outside (a place that at times may be harsh and harmful).

Ever since the first cave paintings, buildings have also become objects or canvasess of artistic expression. In recent years, interest in sustainable planning and building practices has also become part of the design process of many new buildings.

Read more about Building:  Definitions, History, Creation, Building Damage

Other articles related to "buildings, building":

ʻIolani School - Campus
... Buildings include Castle Building, Weinberg Building, the I-Wing, the art building, and the Nangaku Building ...
Tate Modern - History
... The building was converted by architects Herzog de Meuron and contractors Carillion, after which it stood at 99m tall ... basis for a 2008 documentary Architects Herzog and de Meuron Alchemy of Building Tate Modern ... The southern third of the building was retained by the French power company EDF Energy as an electrical substation (in 2006, the company released half of this holding) ...
28 State Street
... Built in 1969, it is Boston's 16th-tallest building, standing 500 feet (152 m) tall, and housing 40 floors ... It has been known as the New England Merchants Bank Building and the Bank of New England Building ... The building has a rectangular footprint which is then setback once near the top floor ...
Cologne - Tourism - High Rise Structures
... A selection of the tallest buildings in Cologne are listed below ... in 1925 - it was at one time Europe's tallest office building), the Kranhaus buildings at Rheinauhafen and the Messeturm Köln (English Trade Fair tower) ... Cologne Tower), Cologne's second tallest building at 165.48 metres (542.91 ft) in height, second only to the Colonius telecommunication tower ...
44 Monroe - History
... In 2004, the long vacant Arizona Bank Building, an 11-story building completed in 1961 on a small quarter of a city square block, was in the process of being remodeled ... In May 2005, Grace Communities announced the existing building would be razed and in its place a 34-story tower would be erected and named 44 Monroe, the site’s address ... In late September 2005, demolition of the Arizona Bank Building began ...

Famous quotes containing the word building:

    It would be naive to think that peace and justice can be achieved easily. No set of rules or study of history will automatically resolve the problems.... However, with faith and perseverance,... complex problems in the past have been resolved in our search for justice and peace. They can be resolved in the future, provided, of course, that we can think of five new ways to measure the height of a tall building by using a barometer.
    Jimmy Carter (James Earl Carter, Jr.)

    There is something about the literary life that repels me, all this desperate building of castles on cobwebs, the long-drawn acrimonious struggle to make something important which we all know will be gone forever in a few years, the miasma of failure which is to me almost as offensive as the cheap gaudiness of popular success.
    Raymond Chandler (1888–1959)

    Marxism is like a classical building that followed the Renaissance; beautiful in its way, but incapable of growth.
    Harold MacMillan (1894–1986)