Ultramarine

Ultramarine is a blue pigment consisting primarily of a zeolite-based mineral containing small amounts of polysulfides. It occurs in nature as a proximate component of lapis lazuli. The pigment color code is P. Blue 29 77007. Ultramarine is the most complex of the mineral pigments, a complex sulfur-containing sodio-silicate (Na8-10Al6Si6O24S2-4) containing a blue cubic mineral called lazurite (the major component in lapis lazuli). Some chloride is often present in the crystal lattice as well. The blue color of the pigment is due to the S3− radical anion, which contains an unpaired electron.

Read more about UltramarineEtymology and History, Production, Synthetic Alternatives, Structure, Ultramarine in Human Culture

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... the robe of the Virgin Mary be coloured with ultramarine costing "at least five good florins an ounce." Good ultramarine was more expensive than gold in 1508 the German painter Albrecht Durer ... Ultramarine pigment, for instance, was much darker when used in oil painting than when used in tempera painting, in frescoes ... balance their colours, Renaissance artists like Raphael added white to lighten the ultramarine ...
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... Literature Ultramarine, a semi-autobiographical work published in 1933, was the first novel by Malcolm Lowry ... Music Ultramarine are a UK-based ambient / ambient house band, formed in the early 1990s by Paul Hammond and Ian Cooper ... Panelology The International Ultramarine Corps, formerly the Ultramarine Corps, is a fictional team of superheroes published by DC Comics ...
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... by Andrea del Sarto (1514) required that the robe of the Virgin Mary be coloured with ultramarine costing "at least five good florins an ounce." Good ultramarine was more expensive than gold in 1508 the German ... Ultramarine pigment, for instance, was much darker when used in oil painting than when used in tempera painting, in frescoes ... Renaissance artists like Raphael added white to lighten the ultramarine ...