Color

Color or colour (see spelling differences) is the visual perceptual property corresponding in humans to the categories called red, green, blue, and others. Color derives from the spectrum of light (distribution of light power versus wavelength) interacting in the eye with the spectral sensitivities of the light receptors. Color categories and physical specifications of color are also associated with objects, materials, light sources, etc., based on their physical properties such as light absorption, reflection, or emission spectra. By defining a color space, colors can be identified numerically by their coordinates.

Because perception of color stems from the varying spectral sensitivity of different types of cone cells in the retina to different parts of the spectrum, colors may be defined and quantified by the degree to which they stimulate these cells. These physical or physiological quantifications of color, however, do not fully explain the psychophysical perception of color appearance.

The science of color is sometimes called chromatics, chromatography, colorimetry, or simply color science. It includes the perception of color by the human eye and brain, the origin of color in materials, color theory in art, and the physics of electromagnetic radiation in the visible range (that is, what we commonly refer to simply as light).

Read more about Color:  Physics, Associations, Spectral Colors and Color Reproduction, Pigments and Reflective Media, Structural Color, Additional Terms

Other articles related to "color":

Color - Additional Terms
... Colorfulness, chroma, purity, or saturation how "intense" or "concentrated" a color is ... These terms, and others related to light and color are internationally agreed upon and published in the CIE Lighting Vocabulary ... Hue the color's direction from white, for example in a color wheel or chromaticity diagram ...
Jonquil (color)
... It is the color of the interior of the central cylindrical tubular projection of the jonquil flower ... The color takes its name from a species of plant, Narcissus jonquilla, which has clusters of small fragrant yellow flowers, and is native to the Mediterranean ... The first known recorded use of jonquil as a color name in English was in 1789 ...

Famous quotes containing the word color:

    For the profit of travel: in the first place, you get rid of a few prejudices.... The prejudiced against color finds several hundred millions of people of all shades of color, and all degrees of intellect, rank, and social worth, generals, judges, priests, and kings, and learns to give up his foolish prejudice.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)

    The great God endows His children variously. To some he gives intellect—and they move the earth. To some he allots heart—and the beating pulse of humanity is theirs. But to some He gives only a soul, without intelligence—and these, who never grow up, but remain always His children, are God’s fools, kindly, elemental, simple, as if from His palette the Artist of all had taken one color instead of many.
    Mary Roberts Rinehart (1876–1958)

    ... ideals, standards, aspirations,—those are chameleon words, and take color from their speakers,—often false tints. A scholarly man of my acquaintance once told me that he traveled a thousand miles into the desert to get away from the word uplift, and it was the first word he heard after he reached his destination.
    Carolyn Wells (1862–1942)