Speak

Speak may refer to:

  • Speech

Read more about Speak:  Music, Literature and Film, Organizations, Other

Other articles related to "speak":

Peru 1993 Census - Languages
... their first language, while Quechua is spoken at home by 16.5% of the population, 2.3% speak Aymara, 0.7% speak other indigenous languages, and 0.2% speak foreign languages ...
Religion In Alaska - Demographics - Languages
... to the 2005–2007 American Community Survey, 84.7% of people over the age of five speak only English at home ... About 3.5% speak Spanish at home ... About 2.2% speak another Indo-European language at home and about 4.3% speak an Asian language at home ...
Parrhesia
... all" + ῥῆσις / ῥῆμα "utterance, speech") meaning literally "to speak everything" and by extension "to speak freely," "to speak boldly," or "boldness." It implies not only freedom of speech ...
Speak - Other
... SPEAK (test), the Speaking Proficiency English Assessment Kit from the Educational Testing Service Speak, young adult division of the publishing company The ...
Bogart–Bacall Syndrome
... People who speak or sing outside of their normal vocal range can develop BBS symptoms are chiefly an unnaturally deep or rough voice, or dysphonia, and vocal fatigue ... The people most commonly afflicted are those who speak in a low-pitched voice, particularly if they have poor breath and vocal control ... or TV/radio voice workers who routinely speak in a very low pitch ...

Famous quotes containing the word speak:

    West Germans are tall, pert and orthodontically corrected, with hands, teeth and hair as clean as their clothes and clothes as sharp as their looks. Except for the fact that they all speak English pretty well, they’re indistinguishable from Americans.
    —P.J. (Patrick Jake)

    We endeavour more that men should speak of us, than how and what they speak, and it sufficeth us that our name run in men’s mouths, in what manner soever. It seemeth that to be known is in some sort to have life and continuance in other men’s keeping.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533–1592)

    On an occasion of this kind it becomes more than a moral duty to speak one’s mind. It becomes a pleasure.
    Oscar Wilde (1854–1900)