List of Titles of Works Based On Shakespearean Phrases

The following is a partially complete list of titles of works based on Shakespearean phrases. It is organized by type of work. Some titles appear in multiple categories and are marked with ++. Note that this is not the place to list film or television adaptations of Shakespeare's plays; the article Shakespeare on screen exists for that purpose.

Read more about List Of Titles Of Works Based On Shakespearean Phrases:  Novels, Short Stories and Nonfiction, Drama, Music, Poetry, Film/Television, Other

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    Every morning I woke in dread, waiting for the day nurse to go on her rounds and announce from the list of names in her hand whether or not I was for shock treatment, the new and fashionable means of quieting people and of making them realize that orders are to be obeyed and floors are to be polished without anyone protesting and faces are to be made to be fixed into smiles and weeping is a crime.
    Janet Frame (b. 1924)

    In tennis, at the end of the day you’re a winner or a loser. You know exactly where you stand.... I don’t need that anymore. I don’t need my happiness, my well-being, to be based on winning and losing.
    Chris Evert (b. 1954)

    She loved Cecil; George made her nervous; will the reader explain to her that the phrases should have been reversed?
    —E.M. (Edward Morgan)

    I have known a German Prince with more titles than subjects, and a Spanish nobleman with more names than shirts.
    Oliver Goldsmith (1728–1774)

    Do your children view themselves as successes or failures? Are they being encouraged to be inquisitive or passive? Are they afraid to challenge authority and to question assumptions? Do they feel comfortable adapting to change? Are they easily discouraged if they cannot arrive at a solution to a problem? The answers to those questions will give you a better appraisal of their education than any list of courses, grades, or test scores.
    Lawrence Kutner (20th century)

    A complete woman is probably not a very admirable creature. She is manipulative, uses other people to get her own way, and works within whatever system she is in.
    Anita Brookner (b. 1938)