List of Titles of Works Based On Shakespearean Phrases

The following is a partially complete list of titles of works based on Shakespearean phrases. It is organized by type of work. Some titles appear in multiple categories and are marked with ++. Note that this is not the place to list film or television adaptations of Shakespeare's plays; the article Shakespeare on screen exists for that purpose.

Read more about List Of Titles Of Works Based On Shakespearean Phrases:  Novels, Short Stories and Nonfiction, Drama, Music, Poetry, Film/Television, Other

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    Do your children view themselves as successes or failures? Are they being encouraged to be inquisitive or passive? Are they afraid to challenge authority and to question assumptions? Do they feel comfortable adapting to change? Are they easily discouraged if they cannot arrive at a solution to a problem? The answers to those questions will give you a better appraisal of their education than any list of courses, grades, or test scores.
    Lawrence Kutner (20th century)

    Language makes it possible for a child to incorporate his parents’ verbal prohibitions, to make them part of himself....We don’t speak of a conscience yet in the child who is just acquiring language, but we can see very clearly how language plays an indispensable role in the formation of conscience. In fact, the moral achievement of man, the whole complex of factors that go into the organization of conscience is very largely based upon language.
    Selma H. Fraiberg (20th century)

    And would you be a poet
    Before you’ve been to school?
    Ah, well! I hardly thought you
    So absolute a fool.
    First learn to be spasmodic—
    A very simple rule.
    For first you write a sentence,
    And then you chop it small;
    Then mix the bits, and sort them out
    Just as they chance to fall:
    The order of the phrases makes
    No difference at all.
    Lewis Carroll [Charles Lutwidge Dodgson] (1832–1898)

    Lear. Dost thou call me fool, boy?
    Fool. All thy other titles thou hast given away; that thou wast born with.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    Thirty—the promise of a decade of loneliness, a thinning list of single men to know, a thinning brief-case of enthusiasm, thinning hair.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896–1940)

    There is a great deal of self-denial and manliness in poor and middle-class houses, in town and country, that has not got into literature, and never will, but that keeps the earth sweet; that saves on superfluities, and spends on essentials; that goes rusty, and educates the boy; that sells the horse, but builds the school; works early and late, takes two looms in the factory, three looms, six looms, but pays off the mortgage on the paternal farm, and then goes back cheerfully to work again.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)