Who is mary kay blakely?

Famous quotes containing the words mary kay blakely, kay blakely, blakely, mary and/or kay:

    We all have bad days, of course, a secret that only makes us feel more guilty. But once my friends and I started telling the truth about how far we deviated from perfection, we couldn’t stop. . . . One mother admitted leaving the grocery store without her kids—”I just forgot them. The manager found them in the frozen foods aisle, eating Eskimo Pies.”
    Mary Kay Blakely (20th century)

    Most literature on the culture of adolescence focuses on peer pressure as a negative force. Warnings about the “wrong crowd” read like tornado alerts in parent manuals. . . . It is a relative term that means different things in different places. In Fort Wayne, for example, the wrong crowd meant hanging out with liberal Democrats. In Connecticut, it meant kids who weren’t planning to get a Ph.D. from Yale.
    —Mary Kay Blakely (20th century)

    Our Lamaze instructor . . . assured our class . . . that our cervix muscles would become “naturally numb” as they swelled and stretched, and deep breathing would turn the final explosions of pain into “manageable discomfort.” This descriptions turned out to be as accurate as, say a steward advising passengers aboard the Titanic to prepare for a brisk but bracing swim.
    —Mary Kay Blakely (20th century)

    Mary had a little lamb,
    Its fleece was white as snow,
    And every where that Mary went
    The lamb was sure to go;
    He followed her to school one day—
    That was against the rule,
    It made the children laugh and play,
    To see a lamb at school.
    Sarah Josepha Buell Hale (1788–1879)

    By now, legions of tireless essayists and op-ed columnists have dressed feminists down for making such a fuss about entering the professions and earning equal pay that everyone’s attention has been distracted from the important contributions of mothers working at home. This judgment presumes, of course, that prior to the resurgence of feminism in the ‘70s, housewives and mothers enjoyed wide recognition and honor. This was not exactly the case.
    —Mary Kay Blakely (20th century)