List of Titles of Works Based On Shakespearean Phrases - Novels, Short Stories and Nonfiction

Novels, Short Stories and Nonfiction

A Midsummer Night's Dream
  • A Midsummer Night's Gene by Andrew Harman (title)
  • Ill Met by Moonlight by W. Stanley Moss (II.i)
Antony and Cleopatra
  • Her Infinite Variety by Louis Auchincloss (II.ii)
  • Beds in the East by Anthony Burgess (II.vi)
  • Gaudy Night by Dorothy Sayers (III.xiii)
As You Like It
  • Under the Greenwood Tree by Thomas Hardy (II.v)
  • And All the Stars a Stage by James Blish (from "All the world's a stage", II.vii)
  • The Lie Direct by Sara Woods (V.iv)
Coriolanus
  • The Exile Kiss by George Alec Effinger (from "O! a kiss / Long as my exile", V:iii)
Hamlet
  • Too, Too Solid Flesh by Nick O'Donohoe (I.ii)
  • This Above All by Eric Knight (I.iii)
  • Something Rotten by Jasper Fforde (I.iv)
  • The Glimpses of the Moon by Edith Wharton; Edmund Crispin (I.iv)
  • There are More Things by Jorge Luis Borges (I.v)
  • More Things in Heaven by John Brunner (I.v)
  • And Be a Villain by Rex Stout (I.v)
  • The Celestial Bed by Irving Wallace (I.v)
  • Time Out of Joint by Philip K. Dick (I.v)
  • Murder Most Foul used by several different mystery writers (I.v)
  • Leave Her to Heaven by Ben Ames Williams (I.v)
  • How Like an Angel by Margaret Millar (II.ii)
  • Her Privates We by Frederic Manning (II.ii); also published as The Middle Parts of Fortune: Somme and Ancre, 1916, referring to the same section of II.ii: 'On fortune's cap we are not the very button ...Then you live about her waist, or in the middle of her favours?'
  • "2BR02B" by Kurt Vonnegut (III.i)
  • What Dreams May Come by Richard Matheson (III.i)
  • Mortal Coils by Aldous Huxley and Immortal Coil by Jeffrey Lang (III.i)
  • Perchance to Dream by Robert B. Parker, Howard Weinstein (Star Trek: The Next Generation novel) and Perforce to Dream by John Wyndham (III.i)
  • With a bare bodkin by Cyril Hare (III.i)
  • All My Sins Remembered by Joe Haldeman (III.i)
  • Single Spies by Alan Bennett (IV.v)
  • Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace (V.i)
  • Put on by Cunning by Ruth Rendell (V.ii)
Henry IV, part 1
  • Tarry and Be Hanged by Sara Woods (I.ii)
  • Time Must Have a Stop by Aldous Huxley (V.iv)
Henry V
  • So Vile a Sin by Ben Aaronovitch & Kate Orman (II.iv)
  • Band of Brothers by Stephen Ambrose (IV.iii)
Julius Caesar
  • The Fault in Our Stars by John Green (from "The fault, dear Brutus is not in our stars", I.ii)
  • This Little Measure by Sara Woods (III.i)
  • The Dogs of War by Frederick Forsyth (III.i)
  • The Evil that Men Do by Nancy Holder++ (III.ii)
  • There is a Tide by Agatha Christie (also known as Taken at the Flood) (IV.iii)
King John
  • Twice-Told Tales by Nathaniel Hawthorne (III.iv)
  • England Have My Bones by T.H. White (from "Heaven take my soul, and England keep my bones", IV.iii)
King Lear
  • "Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came" by Robert Browning (III.iv)
  • The Lake of Darkness by Ruth Rendell (III.v)
  • Every Inch a King by Harry Turtledove (IV.vi)
  • Speak What We Feel (Not What We Ought To Say) by Frederick Buechner (V.iii)
Macbeth
  • Wyrd Sisters by Terry Pratchett (I.iii, etc.)
  • The Seeds of Time by John Wyndham (I.iii)
  • Fatal Vision by Joe McGinniss (II.i)
  • The Moon is Down by John Steinbeck (II.i)
  • Wash This Blood Clean from My Hand by Fred Vargas (II:ii)
  • A Heart So White by Javier Marías (II.ii)
  • Light Thickens by Ngaio Marsh (III.ii)
  • Let It Come Down by Paul Bowles (III.iii)
  • Fire, Burn! by John Dickson Carr (IV.i)
  • Fire Burn and Cauldron Bubble by H. P. Mallory (IV.i)
  • A Charm of Powerful Trouble by Joanne Horniman (IV.i)
  • By the Pricking of My Thumbs by Agatha Christie (IV.i)
  • Something Wicked this Way Comes by Ray Bradbury (IV.i)
  • Tomorrow and Tomorrow by Charles Sheffield (V.v)
  • "Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow" by Kurt Vonnegut (V.v)
  • All My Yesterdays by Cecil Lewis++ (from "all our yesterdays", V.v)
  • Brief Candles by Aldous Huxley (from "Out, out, brief candle!", V.v)
  • The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner (from "it is a tale / Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, / Signifying nothing.", V.v)
  • Taste of Fears by Margaret Millar (V.v)
  • The Way to Dusty Death by Alistair MacLean (V.v)
The Merchant of Venice
  • The Quality of Mercy autobiography of Mercedes McCambridge, and others (IV.i)
  • "A Pound of Flesh" by Thane Rosenbaum (chapter from Rosenbaum's book The Myth of Moral Justice)
Othello
  • Passing Strange by Catherine Aird (I.iii)
  • Nothing if Not Critical by Robert Hughes (II.i)
  • Mortal Engines by Philip Reeve (III.iii)
  • Mortal Engines by Stanisław Lem (III.iii)
  • Pomp and Circumstance by Noël Coward++ (III.iii)
  • Richer Than All His Tribe by Nicholas Monsarrat (V.ii)
Richard II
  • Bid Time Return by Richard Matheson (III.ii)
  • This Blessed Plot by Hugo Young
Richard III
  • The Winter of Our Discontent by John Steinbeck (I.i)
  • Tomorrow in the Battle Think on Me'' by Javier Marías (V:iii)
Romeo and Juliet
  • What's in a Name? by Isaac Asimov (II.ii)
  • Inconstant Moon by Larry Niven (II.ii)
The Sonnets
  • The Darling Buds of May by H.E. Bates++ (XVIII)
  • Chronicles of Wasted Time by Malcolm Muggeridge (CVI)
  • The Pebbled Shore by Elizabeth Longford (LX)
  • Summer's Lease by John Mortimer (XVIII)
  • Remembrance of Things Past by Marcel Proust (only in English translation) (XXX)
  • Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang by Kate Wilhelm (LXXIII)
  • Absent in the Spring by Agatha Christie (XCVIII)
  • Nothing Like the Sun by Anthony Burgess (CXXX)
The Tempest
  • Sea Change by Richard Armstrong (I.ii)
  • Sea Change by Robert B. Parker
  • Sea Change by James Powlik
  • Something Rich and Strange by Patricia A. McKillip (I.ii)
  • Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (V.i)
  • Brave New Girl by Louisa Luna (from "O brave new world,/ That has such people in't", V.i)
  • This Rough Magic by Mary Stewart (V.i)
Timon of Athens
  • Pale Fire by Vladimir Nabokov (IV.iii)
Twelfth Night
  • Cakes and Ale by William Somerset Maugham (II.iii)
  • Sad Cypress by Agatha Christie (II.iii)
  • To Play the Fool by Laurie R. King (III.i)

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