Who is Oliver Goldsmith?

  • (noun): Irish writer of novels and poetry and plays and essays (1728-1774).
    Synonyms: Goldsmith

Oliver Goldsmith

Oliver Goldsmith (10 November 1730 – 4 April 1774) was an Anglo-Irish writer and poet, who is best known for his novel The Vicar of Wakefield (1766), his pastoral poem The Deserted Village (1770), and his plays The Good-Natur'd Man (1768) and She Stoops to Conquer (1771, first performed in 1773). He also wrote An History of the Earth and Animated Nature. He is thought to have written the classic children's tale The History of Little Goody Two-Shoes, the source of the phrase "goody two-shoes".

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Some articles on Oliver Goldsmith:

Smith Hill (house)
... It is believed that the poet, playwright and novelist Oliver Goldsmith may have been born in an earlier house on the site while his mother, Ann Goldsmith (née Jones), was visiting ... Oliver Jones and wife ... John Lloyd, a kinsman of Oliver Goldsmith ...
Memorials Concerning Oliver Goldsmith
... Goldsmith lived in Kingsbury, now in London between 1771–1774 and the Oliver Goldsmith Primary School and Goldsmith Lane there are named after him ... In the play Marx In Soho by Howard Zinn, Marx makes a reference to Goldsmiths' poem, The Deserted Village ... been given to a new lecture theatre and student accommodation on the Trinity College campus Goldsmith Hall ...

Famous quotes containing the words oliver goldsmith, goldsmith and/or oliver:

    I have this very moment finished reading a novel called The Vicar of Wakefield [by Oliver Goldsmith].... It appears to me, to be impossible any person could read this book through with a dry eye and yet, I don’t much like it.... There is but very little story, the plot is thin, the incidents very rare, the sentiments uncommon, the vicar is contented, humble, pious, virtuous—but upon the whole the book has not at all satisfied my expectations.
    Frances Burney (1752–1840)

    Where village statesmen talked with looks profound,
    And news much older than their ale went round.
    —Oliver Goldsmith (1728–1774)

    I have this very moment finished reading a novel called The Vicar of Wakefield [by Oliver Goldsmith].... It appears to me, to be impossible any person could read this book through with a dry eye and yet, I don’t much like it.... There is but very little story, the plot is thin, the incidents very rare, the sentiments uncommon, the vicar is contented, humble, pious, virtuous—but upon the whole the book has not at all satisfied my expectations.
    Frances Burney (1752–1840)