Who is Oliver Goldsmith?

  • (noun): Irish writer of novels and poetry and plays and essays (1728-1774).
    Synonyms: Goldsmith

Oliver Goldsmith

Oliver Goldsmith (10 November 1730 – 4 April 1774) was an Anglo-Irish writer and poet, who is best known for his novel The Vicar of Wakefield (1766), his pastoral poem The Deserted Village (1770), and his plays The Good-Natur'd Man (1768) and She Stoops to Conquer (1771, first performed in 1773). He also wrote An History of the Earth and Animated Nature. He is thought to have written the classic children's tale The History of Little Goody Two-Shoes, the source of the phrase "goody two-shoes".

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Memorials Concerning Oliver Goldsmith
... Goldsmith lived in Kingsbury, now in London between 1771–1774 and the Oliver Goldsmith Primary School and Goldsmith Lane there are named after him ... In the play Marx In Soho by Howard Zinn, Marx makes a reference to Goldsmiths' poem, The Deserted Village ... a new lecture theatre and student accommodation on the Trinity College campus Goldsmith Hall ...
Smith Hill (house)
... It is believed that the poet, playwright and novelist Oliver Goldsmith may have been born in an earlier house on the site while his mother, Ann Goldsmith (née Jones), was ... Oliver Jones and wife ... John Lloyd, a kinsman of Oliver Goldsmith ...

Famous quotes containing the words oliver goldsmith and/or goldsmith:

    We had no revolutions to fear, nor fatigues to undergo; all our adventures were by the fireside, and all our migrations from the blue bed to the brown.
    Oliver Goldsmith (1728–1774)

    To coxcombs averse, yet most civilly steering,
    When they judged without skill he was still hard of hearing:
    When they talked of their Raphaels, Corregios and stuff,
    He shifted his trumpet, and only took snuff.
    —Oliver Goldsmith (1730?–1774)