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Frances Burney

Frances Burney (13 June 1752 – 6 January 1840), also known as Fanny Burney and, after her marriage, as Madame d’Arblay, was an English novelist, diarist and playwright. She was born in Lynn Regis, now King’s Lynn, England, on 13 June 1752, to musical historian Dr Charles Burney (1726–1814) and Mrs Esther Sleepe Burney (1725–62). The third of six children, she was self-educated and began writing what she called her “scribblings” at the age of ten. In 1793, aged forty-two, she married a French exile, General Alexandre D'Arblay. Their only son, Alexander, was born in 1794. After a lengthy writing career, and travels that took her to France for more than ten years, she settled in Bath, England, where she died on 6 January 1840.

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Frances Burney (1776–1828) - Family and Life
... Frances Burney was the niece of the novelists Frances Burney and Sarah Burney, and the granddaughter of the musicologist Charles Burney ... One of eight children of the impecunious musicians Esther (Hetty) Burney (1749–1832) and Charles Rousseau Burney (1747–1819), who were cousins, she became a governess ... It has been speculated by the author of her ODNB entry Burney was affected by "the concerns of her grandfather Charles Burney (1726–1814) about the potential impropriety of the stage, particularly ...

Famous quotes containing the words frances burney and/or burney:

    Such a set of tittle tattle, prittle prattle visitants! Oh Dear! I am so sick of the ceremony and fuss of these fall lall people! So much dressing—chitchat—complimentary nonsense—In short, a country town is my detestation. All the conversation is scandal, all the attention, dress, and almost all the heart, folly, envy, and censoriousness.
    Frances Burney (1752–1840)

    When young people are too rigidly sequestered from [the world], their lively and romantic imaginations paint it to them as a paradise of which they have been beguiled; but when they are shown it properly, and in due time, they see it such as it really is, equally shared by pain and pleasure, hope and disappointment.
    —Frances Burney (1752–1840)