KAIST - Academics - Colleges - College of Cultural Science

College of Cultural Science

The College of Culture and Science is composed of two departments: School of Humanities and Social Sciences and Graduate School of Culture and Technology.

The School of Humanities and Social Sciences offers students an undergraduate education in a range of courses in the humanities and social sciences. The Graduate School of Culture and Technology also provides master and doctoral degree programs for the purpose of producing manpower of the nation’s cultural industry with support of the Ministry of Culture and Tourism.

The School of Humanities and Social Sciences has about 75 faculty members (3 professor emeritus, 18 full-time faculties, 13 visiting professors, 1 research professor, 40 lecturers), the Graduate School of Culture and Technology also has 4 full-time faculties, 5 visiting professors, 7 adjunct professors, and 89 master students and 36 doctoral students. The Graduate School established the Humanities and Social Science Research Center and the Culture and Technology Research Center, and has carried out various research projects.

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