Abstract

Abstract may refer to:

  • Abstract (law), a summary of a legal document
  • Abstract (summary), in scientific publishing
  • Abstract art, artistic works that don't attempt to represent reality or concrete subjects
  • Abstract object in philosophy
  • Abstract structure in mathematics
  • Abstract type in computer science
  • The property of an abstraction
  • Q-Tip (rapper), also known as "The Abstract"

Other articles related to "abstract":

Luigi Malice
... Luigi Malice (born 1937, Naples, Italy) is an Italian abstract artist ... an Italian art movement close to the American Abstract expressionism and to the French Art Informel or Tachisme ... Subsequently, his art took on abstract impressionism and lyrism of the colours ...
Lynne Mapp Drexler
... There, she became a devotee of Abstract Expressionism, and studied with two major figures of the movement Hans Hofmann and Robert Motherwell ... artistic style developed, Drexler's paintings became less strictly abstract and exhibited a synthesis of abstract and representational influences ...
Lucienne Day
... Inspired by abstract art, she pioneered the use of bright, optimistic, abstract patterns in post-war England, and was eventually celebrated worldwide ... work combined organic shapes with bright patterns inspired by contemporary abstract painters such as Wassily Kandinsky and Joan MirĂ³ ... She originated hundreds of colourful abstract prints for industry clients such as Heal's ...
Method (computer Science) - Abstract Methods
... An abstract method is one with only a signature and no implementation body ... Abstract methods are used to specify interfaces in some computer languages ...
Seven And Five Society
... been too much pioneering along too many lines in altogether too much of a hurry." Abstract artist Ben Nicholson joined in 1924, followed by others such as Henry Moore and Barbara ... In 1935, the group was renamed the Seven and Five Abstract Group ... they staged the first exhibition of entirely abstract works in Britain ...

Famous quotes containing the word abstract:

    Some ghosts are women,
    neither abstract nor pale,
    their breasts as limp as killed fish.
    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)

    Oh, may the tide be soon enough at high
    To keep our abstract verse from being dry.
    Robert Frost (1874–1963)

    The man who knows governments most completely is he who troubles himself least about a definition which shall give their essence. Enjoying an intimate acquaintance with all their particularities in turn, he would naturally regard an abstract conception in which these were unified as a thing more misleading than enlightening.
    William James (1842–1910)