Wing

A wing is a type of fin with a surface that produces lift for flight or propulsion through the atmosphere, or through another gaseous or liquid fluid. As such, wings have an airfoil shape, a streamlined cross-sectional shape producing a useful lift to drag ratio.

The word "wing" from the Old Norse vængr for many centuries referred mainly to the foremost limbs of birds (in addition to the architectural aisle.) But in recent centuries the word's meaning has extended to include lift producing appendages of insects, bats, pterosaurs, boomerangs, some sail boats and aircraft, or the inverted airfoil on a race car that generates a downward force to increase traction.

Various species of penguins and other flighted or flightless water birds such as auks, cormorants, guillemots, shearwaters, eider and scoter ducks and diving petrels are avid swimmers, and use their wings to propel through water.

A wing's aerodynamic quality is expressed as its lift-to-drag ratio. The lift a wing generates at a given speed and angle of attack can be one to two orders of magnitude greater than the total drag on the wing. A high lift-to-drag ratio requires a significantly smaller thrust to propel the wings through the air at sufficient lift.

Read more about Wing:  The Aerodynamics of Wings, Design Features

Famous quotes containing the word wing:

    The wild touch of thy dye-dusty wing!
    I found that wing broken today!
    Robert Frost (1874–1963)

    If a liberal policy towards the late Rebels is adopted, the ultra Republicans are opposed to it; if the colored people are honored, the extremists of the other wing cry out against it. I suspect I am right in both cases.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)

    As if her velvet helmet high
    Did turret rationality.
    She fans her wing up to the winde
    As if her Pettycoate were lin’de
    With reasons fleece, and hoises saile
    And humming flies in thankfull gaile
    Edward Taylor (1645–1729)