Wing

A wing is a type of fin with a surface that produces lift for flight or propulsion through the atmosphere, or through another gaseous or liquid fluid. As such, wings have an airfoil shape, a streamlined cross-sectional shape producing a useful lift to drag ratio.

The word "wing" from the Old Norse vængr for many centuries referred mainly to the foremost limbs of birds (in addition to the architectural aisle.) But in recent centuries the word's meaning has extended to include lift producing appendages of insects, bats, pterosaurs, boomerangs, some sail boats and aircraft, or the inverted airfoil on a race car that generates a downward force to increase traction.

Various species of penguins and other flighted or flightless water birds such as auks, cormorants, guillemots, shearwaters, eider and scoter ducks and diving petrels are avid swimmers, and use their wings to propel through water.

A wing's aerodynamic quality is expressed as its lift-to-drag ratio. The lift a wing generates at a given speed and angle of attack can be one to two orders of magnitude greater than the total drag on the wing. A high lift-to-drag ratio requires a significantly smaller thrust to propel the wings through the air at sufficient lift.

Read more about Wing:  The Aerodynamics of Wings, Design Features

Famous quotes containing the word wing:

    the uncomfortable angels that rot
    On the slabs, a wing chipped here, an arm there:
    The brute curiosity of an angel’s stare
    Turns you, like them, to stone....
    Allen Tate (1899–1979)

    Sure smokers have made personal choices. And they pay for those choices every day, whether sitting through an airline flight dying for a smoke, or dying for a smoke in the oncology wing of a hospital. The tobacco companies have not paid nearly enough for the killing.
    Anna Quindlen (b. 1952)

    the embattled flaming multitude
    Who rise, wing above wing, flame above flame,
    And, like a storm, cry the Ineffable Name,
    And with the clashing of their sword-blades make
    A rapturous music, till the morning break....
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)