Window - Terms

Terms

  • Light is the area between the outer parts of a window (transom, sill and jambs), usually filled with a glass pane. Multiple panes are divided by mullions when load-bearing, muntins when not.
  • Lattice light is a compound window pane madeup of small pieces of glass held together in a lattice.
  • Fixed window is a unit of one non-moving lite. The terms "single-light", "double-light" etc. refer to the number of these glass panes in a window.
  • Sash unit is a window consisting of at least one sliding glass component, typically composed of two lites (known as a "double-light").
  • Replacement window in the United States means a framed window designed to slip inside the original window frame from the inside after the old sashes are removed. In Europe it usually means a complete window including a replacement outer frame.
  • New construction window in the US, the term means a window with a nailing fin designed to be inserted into a rough opening from the outside before applying siding and inside trim. A nailing fin is a projection on the outer frame of the window in the same plane as the glazing, which overlaps the prepared opening, and can thus be 'nailed' into place.
In the UK and mainland Europe, windows in new-build houses are usually fixed with long screws into expanding plastic plugs in the brickwork. A gap of up to 13mm is left around all four sides, and filled with expanding polyurethane foam. This makes the window fixing weatherproof but allows for expansion due to heat.
  • Lintel is a beam over the top of a window, also known as a transom.
  • Sill plate (windowsill or window ledge is a beam below the bottom of a window.
  • Secondary Glazing is an additional frame applied to the inside of an existing frame, usually used on protected or listed buildings to achieve higher levels of thermal and sound insulation without compromising the look of the building

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