Who is theodore roethke?

Theodore Roethke

Theodore Roethke ( /ˈrɛtki/ RET-kee; May 25, 1908 – August 1, 1963) was an American poet, who published several volumes of poetry characterized by its rhythm, rhyming, and natural imagery. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1954 for his book, The Waking, and he won the annual National Book Award for Poetry twice, in 1959 for Words for the Wind and posthumously in 1965 for The Far Field.

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Famous quotes containing the words theodore roethke, theodore and/or roethke:

    The living all assemble! What’s the cue?—
    Do what the clumsy partner wants to do!
    Theodore Roethke (1908–1963)

    Where there is no vision, the people perish.
    Bible: Hebrew Proverbs, 29:18.

    President John F. Kennedy quoted this passage on the eve of his assassination in Dallas, Texas; recorded in Theodore C. Sorenson’s biography, Kennedy, Epilogue (1965)

    With these I would be.
    And with water: the waves coming forward, without cessation,
    The waves, altered by sand-bars, beds of kelp, miscellaneous
    driftwood,
    Topped by cross-winds, tugged at by sinuous undercurrents
    The tide rustling in, sliding between the ridges of stone,
    The tongues of water, creeping in, quietly.
    —Theodore Roethke (1908–1963)