Who is Laurence Sterne?

  • (noun): English writer (born in Ireland) (1713-1766).
    Synonyms: Sterne

Laurence Sterne

Laurence Sterne (24 November 1713 – 18 March 1768) was an Anglo-Irish novelist and an Anglican clergyman. He is best known for his novels The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, and A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy; but he also published many sermons, wrote memoirs, and was involved in local politics. Sterne died in London after years of fighting consumption.

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Some articles on Laurence Sterne:

Sutton-on-the-Forest - Laurence Sterne
... Laurence Sterne was the vicar of this parish, but when the parsonage house was destroyed by fire, he moved to nearby Coxwold ...
Laurence Sterne - Bibliography
... The Florida Edition of Sterne's works is currently the leading scholarly edition – although the final volume (Sterne's letters) has yet to be published ... Digressions Tristram Shandy as Perceived and Influenced by Sterne's Early Imitators (Amsterdam, 2007) W ... York, 1911) Percy Fitzgerald, Life of Laurence Sterne (London, 1864 second edition, London, 1896) Paul Stapfer, Laurence Sterne, sa personne et ses ouvrages (second edition, Paris, 1882) H ...

Famous quotes containing the words laurence sterne, sterne and/or laurence:

    What these perplexities of my uncle Toby were,—’tis impossible for you to guess;Mif you could,—I should blush ... as an author; inasmuch as I set no small store by myself upon this very account, that my reader has never yet been able to guess at any thing. And ... if I thought you was able to form the least ... conjecture to yourself, of what was to come in the next page,—I would tear it out of my book.
    Laurence Sterne (1713–1768)

    ‘Tis going, I own, like the Knight of the Woeful Countenance, in quest of melancholy adventures—but I know not how it is, but I am never so perfectly conscious of the existence of a soul within me, as when I am entangled in them.
    —Laurence Sterne (1713–1768)

    We sing, but oh the clay is vile
    Beneath our feet, and long the mile;
    But let the world dream otherwise,
    We wear the mask!
    —Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872–1906)