Who is hart crane?

Hart Crane

Harold Hart Crane (July 21, 1899 – April 27, 1932) was an American poet. Finding both inspiration and provocation in the poetry of T. S. Eliot, Crane wrote modernist poetry that was difficult, highly stylized, and ambitious in its scope. In his most ambitious work, The Bridge, Crane sought to write an epic poem, in the vein of The Waste Land, that expressed a more optimistic view of modern, urban culture than the one that he found in Eliot's work. In the years following his suicide at the age of 32, Crane has been hailed by playwrights, poets, and literary critics alike (including Robert Lowell, Derek Walcott, Tennessee Williams, and Harold Bloom), as being one of the most influential poets of his generation.

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Famous quotes containing the words hart crane, hart and/or crane:

    The phonographs of hades in the brain
    Are tunnels that re-wind themselves, and love
    A burnt match skating in a urinal—
    Hart Crane (1899–1932)

    Bewitched, bothered and bewildered am I.
    —Lorenz Hart (1895–1943)

    Yet, to the empty trapeze of your flesh,
    O Magdalene, each comes back to die alone.
    Then you, the burlesque of our lust—and faith,
    Lug us back lifeward—bone by infant bone.
    —Hart Crane (1899–1932)