Who is hart crane?

Hart Crane

Harold Hart Crane (July 21, 1899 – April 27, 1932) was an American poet. Finding both inspiration and provocation in the poetry of T. S. Eliot, Crane wrote modernist poetry that was difficult, highly stylized, and ambitious in its scope. In his most ambitious work, The Bridge, Crane sought to write an epic poem, in the vein of The Waste Land, that expressed a more optimistic view of modern, urban culture than the one that he found in Eliot's work. In the years following his suicide at the age of 32, Crane has been hailed by playwrights, poets, and literary critics alike (including Robert Lowell, Derek Walcott, Tennessee Williams, and Harold Bloom), as being one of the most influential poets of his generation.

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Famous quotes containing the words hart crane, hart and/or crane:

    O brilliant kids, frisk with your dog,
    Fondle your shells and sticks, bleached
    By time and the elements; but there is a line
    You must not cross
    Hart Crane (1899–1932)

    Before I had my first child, I never really looked forward in anticipation to the future. As I watched my son grow and learn, I began to imagine the world this generation of children would live in. I thought of the children they would have, and of their children. I felt connected to life both before my time and beyond it. Children are our link to future generations that we will never see.
    —Louise Hart (20th century)

    And so it was I entered the broken world
    To trace the visionary company of love,
    —Hart Crane (1899–1932)