Who is elizabeth cady stanton?

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth Cady Stanton (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902) was an American social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early women's rights movement. Her Declaration of Sentiments, presented at the first women's rights convention held in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York, is often credited with initiating the first organized women's rights and women's suffrage movements in the United States.

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Famous quotes containing the words cady stanton, elizabeth cady, cady and/or stanton:

    What an infernal set of fools those schoolmarms must be! Well, if in order to please men they wish to live on air, let them. The sooner the present generation of women dies out, the better. We have idiots enough in the world now without such women propagating any more.
    —Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815–1902)

    I consider women a great deal superior to men. Men are physically strong, but women are morally better.... It is woman who keeps the world in balance.
    Mrs. Chalkstone, U.S. suffragist. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 2, ch. 16, by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage (1882)

    The Bible and the Church have been the greatest stumbling blocks in the way of women’s emancipation.
    —Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815–1902)

    So closely interwoven have been our lives, our purposes, and experiences that, separated, we have a feeling of incompleteness—united, such strength of self-association that no ordinary obstacles, difficulties, or dangers ever appear to us insurmountable.
    —Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815–1902)