Who is alexander pope?

Alexander Pope

Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) was an 18th-century English poet, best known for his satirical verse and for his translation of Homer. Famous for his use of the heroic couplet, he is the third-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, after Shakespeare and Tennyson.

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Famous quotes containing the words alexander pope, alexander and/or pope:

    Thus Pegasus, a nearer way to take,
    May boldly deviate from the common track.
    From vulgar bounds with brave disorder part,
    And snatch a grace beyond the reach of art,
    Which without passing through the judgment, gains
    The heart, and all its end at once attains.
    Alexander Pope (1688–1744)

    I thought when I was a young man that I would conquer the world with truth. I thought I would lead an army greater than Alexander ever dreamed of. Not to conquer nations, but to liberate mankind. With truth. With the golden sound of the Word. But only a few of them heard. Only a few of you understood. The rest of you put on black and sat in chapel.
    Philip Dunne (1908–1992)

    Good God! how often are we to die before we go quite off this stage? In every friend we lose a part of ourselves, and the best part.
    —Alexander Pope (1688–1744)