Who is alexander pope?

Alexander Pope

Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) was an 18th-century English poet, best known for his satirical verse and for his translation of Homer. Famous for his use of the heroic couplet, he is the third-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, after Shakespeare and Tennyson.

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Famous quotes containing the words alexander pope, alexander and/or pope:

    Eternal smiles his emptiness betray,
    As shallow streams run dimpling all the way.
    Alexander Pope (1688–1744)

    I shall not cease to bless because
    I lay about me with the taws
    That night and morning I may thrash
    Greek Alexander from my flesh,
    Augustus Caesar, and after these
    That great rogue Alcibiades.
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

    Is it, in Heav’n, a crime to love too well?
    To bear too tender or too firm a heart,
    To act a lover’s or a Roman’s part?
    —Alexander Pope (1688–1744)