Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf

Adeline Virginia Woolf (/ˈwʊlf/; 25 January 1882 – 28 March 1941) was an English writer, regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century.

During the interwar period, Woolf was a significant figure in London literary society and a member of the Bloomsbury Group. Her most famous works include the novels Mrs Dalloway (1925), To the Lighthouse (1927) and Orlando (1928), and the book-length essay A Room of One's Own (1929), with its famous dictum, "A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction."

Read more about Virginia Woolf:  Early Life, Bloomsbury, Work, Death, Modern Scholarship and Interpretations, Depictions

Famous quotes by virginia woolf:

    The older one grows the more one likes indecency.
    Virginia Woolf (1882–1941)

    The telephone, which interrupts the most serious conversations and cuts short the most weighty observations, has a romance of its own.
    Virginia Woolf (1882–1941)

    Middlemarch, the magnificent book which with all its imperfections is one of the few English novels for grown-up people.
    Virginia Woolf (1882–1941)

    We all indulge in the strange, pleasant process called thinking, but when it comes to saying, even to someone opposite, what we think, then how little we are able to convey! The phantom is through the mind and out of the window before we can lay salt on its tail, or slowly sinking and returning to the profound darkness which it has lit up momentarily with a wandering light.
    Virginia Woolf (1882–1941)

    That a famous library has been cursed by a woman is a matter of complete indifference to a famous library. Venerable and calm, with all its treasures safe locked within its breast, it sleeps complacently and will, so far as I am concerned, so sleep forever. Never will I wake these echoes, never will I ask for that hospitality again ...
    Virginia Woolf (1882–1941)