Van - Word Usage and Etymology

Word Usage and Etymology

The word van is a shortened version of the word caravan, which originally meant a covered vehicle.

The word van has slightly different, but overlapping, meanings in different forms of English. While the word always applies to boxy cargo vans, the most major differences in usage are found between the different English-speaking countries.

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Famous quotes containing the words word, usage and/or etymology:

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