The Broken Tower

The Broken Tower

The last new poem meant to be published in Hart Crane's life, 'The Broken Tower' (1932) has been widely acknowledged as one of the best lyrics of Crane's last years, if not his career. In keeping with the varieties and difficulties of Crane criticism, the poem has been interpreted widely--as death ode, life ode, process poem, visionary poem, poem on failed vision--but its biographical impetus out of Crane's first heterosexual affair (with Peggy Cowley, estranged wife of Malcolm Cowley) is generally undisputed. Written early in the year, the poem was rejected by Poetry, and only appeared in print (in The New Republic) after Crane's famous suicide by water. (Compare his great homosexual love-cycle, ' Voyages'.)

Read more about The Broken Tower:  Further Reading

Famous quotes containing the words broken and/or tower:

    London Bridge is broken down,
    Dance o’er my lady lee,
    London Bridge is broken down,
    With a gay lady.
    How shall we build it up again?
    Dance o’er my lady lee,
    Unknown. London Bridge (l. 1–6)

    Out in Hollywood, where the streets are paved with Goldwyn, the word “sophisticate” means, very simply, “obscene.” A sophisticated story is a dirty story. Some of that meaning was wafted eastward and got itself mixed up into the present definition. So that a “sophisticate” means: one who dwells in a tower made of a DuPont substitute for ivory and holds a glass of flat champagne in one hand and an album of dirty post cards in the other.
    Dorothy Parker (1893–1967)