Tang Poetry

Tang poetry (traditional Chinese: 唐詩; simplified Chinese: 唐诗; pinyin: Táng shī) refers to poetry written in or around the time of or in the characteristic style of China's Tang dynasty, (June 18, 618 - June 4, 907, including the 690-705 reign of Wu Zetian) and/or follows a certain style, often considered as the Golden Age of Chinese poetry. According to the Quantangshi anthology created under the Kangxi emperor of the Qing Dynasty, there were almost 50,000 Tang poems written by over 2,200 authors. During the Tang Dynasty, poetry continued to be an important part of social life at all levels of society. Scholars were required to master poetry for the civil service examinations, but the art was theoretically available to everyone. This led to a large record of poetry and poets, a partial record of which survives today. Two of the most famous poets of the period were Du Fu and Li Bai.

Read more about Tang Poetry:  The Importance of Tang Poetry, The Pre-Tang Poetic Tradition, History of Tang Poetry, Continuation of Tang Poetry in Southern Tang, Tang Poetry After The Fall of The Tang Dynasty, Anthologies, English Translators of Tang Poetry, Characteristics of Tang Poetry, Buddhism, Taoism, and Confucianism in Relationship To Tang Poetry, Gender Studies and Tang Poetry, See Also, Interwiki

Famous quotes containing the words tang and/or poetry:

    The art of cursing people seems to have lost its tang since the old days when a good malediction took four deep breaths to deliver and sent the outfielders scurrying toward the fence to field.
    Robert Benchley (1889–1945)

    A verbal art like poetry is reflective; it stops to think. Music is immediate, it goes on to become.
    —W.H. (Wystan Hugh)