Status

Status (Latin plural: statūs), is a state, condition, or situation.

Status may also refer to:

  • Social status, in sociology
    • Achieved status
    • Ascribed status
    • Master status
    • Socioeconomic status
    • Sociometric status
    • Status attainment
    • Status shift
  • Status (law) and legal status, in law
    • City status
    • Political status, in international law
    • Small entity status, in patent law
    • Status conference
    • Status crime
    • Status offense
  • Conservation status of a species
  • HIV test (HIV Status)
  • Marital status
  • Observer status, in international organizations
  • Oratory status, in churches
  • Performance status, in medicine
  • Recurring status, in acting
  • Senior status
  • Status brand, in marketing
  • Status constructus, a noun form
  • Status effect, in gaming
  • Status of religious freedom by country
  • Status quo
  • Status symbol
  • Status, a magazine edited by Igor Cassini

Read more about Status:  Technology

Famous quotes containing the word status:

    His Majesty’s Government view with favour the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people, and will use their best endeavours to facilitate the achievement of this object, it being clearly understood that nothing shall be done which may prejudice the civil and religious rights of existing non-Jewish communities in Palestine, or the rights and political status enjoyed by Jews in any other country.
    —A.J. (Arthur James)

    Recent studies that have investigated maternal satisfaction have found this to be a better prediction of mother-child interaction than work status alone. More important for the overall quality of interaction with their children than simply whether the mother works or not, these studies suggest, is how satisfied the mother is with her role as worker or homemaker. Satisfied women are consistently more warm, involved, playful, stimulating and effective with their children than unsatisfied women.
    Alison Clarke-Stewart (20th century)

    [In early adolescence] she becomes acutely aware of herself as a being perceived by others, judged by others, though she herself is the harshest judge, quick to list her physical flaws, quick to undervalue and under-rate herself not only in terms of physical appearance but across a wide range of talents, capacities and even social status, whereas boys of the same age will cite their abilities, their talents and their social status pretty accurately.
    Terri Apter (20th century)