Southern Rhodesia - Evolution of Southern Rhodesia

Evolution of Southern Rhodesia

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History of Zimbabwe
Ancient history
Mapungubwe Kingdom c.1075–1220
Zimbabwe Kingdom c.1220–1450
Mutapa Kingdom c.1450–1760
Torwa dynasty c.1450–1683
Rozwi Empire c.1684–1834
Matabeleland 1838–1894
BSA Company rule 1890–1923
First Matabele War 1893–1894
Second Matabele War 1896–1897
Southern Rhodesia 1923–1965
World War II 1939–1945
Malayan Emergency 1948–1960
Federation 1953–1963
Rhodesian Bush War 1964–1979
Rhodesia 1965–1979
Zimbabwe Rhodesia 1979
S. Rhodesia dependency 1979–1980
Zimbabwe 1980–
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Famous quotes containing the words evolution of, evolution and/or southern:

    Like Freud, Jung believes that the human mind contains archaic remnants, residues of the long history and evolution of mankind. In the unconscious, primordial “universally human images” lie dormant. Those primordial images are the most ancient, universal and “deep” thoughts of mankind. Since they embody feelings as much as thought, they are properly “thought feelings.” Where Freud postulates a mass psyche, Jung postulates a collective psyche.
    Patrick Mullahy (b. 1912)

    By contrast with history, evolution is an unconscious process. Another, and perhaps a better way of putting it would be to say that evolution is a natural process, history a human one.... Insofar as we treat man as a part of nature—for instance in a biological survey of evolution—we are precisely not treating him as a historical being. As a historically developing being, he is set over against nature, both as a knower and as a doer.
    Owen Barfield (b. 1898)

    As it grew darker, I was startled by the honking of geese flying low over the woods, like weary travellers getting in late from Southern lakes, and indulging at last in unrestrained complaint and mutual consolation. Standing at my door, I could hear the rush of their wings; when, driving toward my house, they suddenly spied my light, and with hushed clamor wheeled and settled in the pond. So I came in, and shut the door, and passed my first spring night in the woods.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)