Silk

Silk is a natural protein fibre, some forms of which can be woven into textiles. The protein fibre of silk is composed mainly of fibroin and produced by certain insect larvae to form cocoons. The best-known type of silk is obtained from the cocoons of the larvae of the mulberry silkworm Bombyx mori reared in captivity (sericulture). The shimmering appearance of silk is due to the triangular prism-like structure of the silk fibre, which allows silk cloth to refract incoming light at different angles, thus producing different colors.

Silks are produced by several other insects, but generally only the silk of moth caterpillars has been used for textile manufacturing. There has been some research into other silks, which differ at the molecular level. Many silks are mainly produced by the larvae of insects undergoing complete metamorphosis, but some adult insects such as webspinners produce silk, and some insects such as raspy crickets produce silk throughout their lives. Silk production also occurs in Hymenoptera (bees, wasps, and ants), silverfish, mayflies, thrips, leafhoppers, beetles, lacewings, fleas, flies and midges. Other types of arthropod produce silk, most notably various arachnids such as spiders (see spider silk).

Read more about Silk:  Etymology, Production Process, Uses, Animal Rights

Famous quotes containing the word silk:

    Why silk is soft and the stone wounds
    The child shall question all his days,
    Why night-time rain and the breast’s blood
    Both quench his thirst he’ll have a black reply.
    Dylan Thomas (1914–1953)

    Her fortune, too, lies there,
    Converted into cool hard steel
    And right red velvet lining;
    While over her tan impassivity
    Shot silk is shining.
    Gwendolyn Brooks (b. 1917)

    ‘Tis not your inky brows, your black silk hair,
    Your bugle eyeballs, nor your cheek of cream
    That can entame my spirits to your worship.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)