Sequence Point

A sequence point defines any point in a computer program's execution at which it is guaranteed that all side effects of previous evaluations will have been performed, and no side effects from subsequent evaluations have yet been performed. They are often mentioned in reference to C and C++, because the result of some expressions can depend on the order of evaluation of their subexpressions. Adding one or more sequence points is one method of ensuring a consistent result, because this restricts the possible orders of evaluation.

With C++11, the most recent iteration of the C++ programming language, usage of the term sequence point has been replaced by specifying that either one evaluation is sequenced before another, or that two evaluations are unsequenced. The execution of unsequenced evaluations can overlap.

Read more about Sequence Point:  Examples of Ambiguity, Sequence Points in C and C++

Famous quotes containing the words sequence and/or point:

    It isn’t that you subordinate your ideas to the force of the facts in autobiography but that you construct a sequence of stories to bind up the facts with a persuasive hypothesis that unravels your history’s meaning.
    Philip Roth (b. 1933)

    If twins are believed to be less intelligent as a class than single-born children, it is not surprising that many times they are also seen as ripe for social and academic problems in school. No one knows the extent to which these kind of attitudes affect the behavior of multiples in school, and virtually nothing is known from a research point of view about social behavior of twins over the age of six or seven, because this hasn’t been studied either.
    Pamela Patrick Novotny (20th century)