Rise Time

In electronics, when describing a voltage or current step function, rise time is the time taken by a signal to change from a specified low value to a specified high value. Typically, in analog electronics, these values are 10% and 90% of the step height: in control theory applications, according to Levine (1996, p. 158), rise time is defined as "the time required for the response to rise from x% to y% of its final value", with 0%-100% rise time common for underdamped second order systems, 5%-95% for critically damped and 10%-90% for overdamped. The output signal of a system is characterized also by fall time: both parameters depend on rise and fall times of input signal and on the characteristics of the system.

Read more about Rise Time:  Overview, Simple Examples of Calculation of Rise Time, Factors Affecting Rise Time, Rise Time in Control Applications

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