Region - Regions in Human Geography

Regions in Human Geography

Human geography is a branch of geography that focuses on the study of patterns and processes that shape human interaction with various discrete environments. It encompasses human, political, cultural, social, and economic aspects among others that are often clearly delineated. While the major focus of human geography is not the physical landscape of the Earth (see physical geography), it is hardly possible to discuss human geography without referring to the physical landscape on which human activities are being played out, and environmental geography is emerging as a link between the two. Regions of human geography can be divided into many broad categories, such as:

  • Cultural geography
  • Demography
  • Development geography
  • Economic geography
  • Ethnography
  • Geopolitics
  • Health geography
  • Historical geography
  • Language geography
  • Religion geography
  • Social geography
  • Time geography
  • Tourism geography
  • Transportation geography
  • Urban geography

Read more about this topic:  Region

Famous quotes containing the words regions, human and/or geography:

    Nature seems to have taken a particular Care to disseminate her Blessings among the different Regions of the World, with an Eye to this mutual Intercourse and Traffick among Mankind, that the Natives of the several Parts of the Globe might have a kind of Dependance [sic] upon one another, and be united together by their common Interest.
    Joseph Addison (1672–1719)

    I am really sorry to see my countrymen trouble themselves about politics. If men were wise, the most arbitrary princes could not hurt them. If they are not wise, the freest government is compelled to be a tyranny. Princes appear to me to be fools. Houses of Commons & Houses of Lords appear to me to be fools; they seem to me to be something else besides human life.
    William Blake (1757–1827)

    Yet America is a poem in our eyes; its ample geography dazzles the imagination, and it will not wait long for metres.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)