Quest

In mythology and literature, a quest, a journey towards a goal, serves as a plot device and (frequently) as a symbol. Quests appear in the folklore of every nation and also figure prominently in non-national cultures. In literature, the objects of quests require great exertion on the part of the hero, and the overcoming of many obstacles, typically including much travel. The aspect of travel also allows the storyteller to showcase exotic locations and cultures (an objective of the narrator, not of the character).

Read more about Quest:  Quest Objects, Literary Analysis, Historical Examples, Modern Literature

Famous quotes containing the word quest:

    Of all the nations in the world, the United States was built in nobody’s image. It was the land of the unexpected, of unbounded hope, of ideals, of quest for an unknown perfection. It is all the more unfitting that we should offer ourselves in images. And all the more fitting that the images which we make wittingly or unwittingly to sell America to the world should come back to haunt and curse us.
    Daniel J. Boorstin (b. 1914)

    The tranquility and peace that a scholar needs is something as sweet and exhilarating as love. Unspeakable joys are showered on us by the exertion of our mental faculties; the quest of ideas, and the tranquil contemplation of knowledge; delights indescribable, because purely intellectual and impalpable to our senses.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799–1850)

    Thou art the unanswered question;
    Couldst see thy proper eye,
    Alway it asketh, asketh;
    And each answer is a lie.
    So take thy quest through nature,
    It through thousand natures ply;
    Ask on, thou clothed eternity;
    Time is the false reply.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)