Prose

Prose is a form of language which applies ordinary grammatical structure and natural flow of speech rather than rhythmic structure (as in traditional poetry). While there are critical debates on the construction of prose, its simplicity and loosely defined structure has led to its adoption for the majority of spoken dialogue, factual discourse as well as topical and fictional writing. It is commonly used, for example, in literature, newspapers, magazines, encyclopedias, broadcasting, film, history, philosophy, law and many other forms of communication.

Read more about Prose:  Structure, Types

Famous quotes containing the word prose:

    The crown of literature is poetry. It is its end and aim. It is the sublimest activity of the human mind. It is the achievement of beauty and delicacy. The writer of prose can only step aside when the poet passes.
    W. Somerset Maugham (1874–1966)

    Good authors, too, who once knew better words
    Now only use four-letter words
    Writing prose ...
    Anything goes.
    Cole Porter (1893–1964)

    “There comes Emerson first, whose rich words, every one,
    Are like gold nails in temples to hang trophies on,
    Whose prose is grand verse, while his verse, the Lord knows,
    Is some of it pr—No, ‘t is not even prose;
    I’m speaking of metres;
    James Russell Lowell (1819–1891)